The Association for Legal Career Professionals (NALP) recently found that, nine months after their graduation, only 85.6% of the 2011 law school graduation class was employed, the lowest percentage since the class of 1994.  Of those found to be employed, only 65.4% were in jobs requiring admission to the Bar, the lowest percentage ever measured. While no clear signs pointed to a halt in hiring when these students entered law school, NALP Executive Director James Leipold believes that they are now facing what is “arguably the worst entry-level legal employment market in 30 years.”  A record number of graduates (18.1% of those employed) are finding jobs in business with private practice positions on the decline.  These jobs usually consist of temporary law clerk or paralegal positions for private agencies.

Additionally, figures from the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics predicts that although approximately 73,600 legal jobs will be created between 2010-2020, over 130,000  new lawyers have been generated since the date of that study. That means that nearly 60,000 more attorneys have been barred than there are predicted jobs available for those attorneys in the coming decade. With recruiting statistics appearing to be on the rise for 2012 and 2013, NALP hopes that 2011 represented the bottom of the legal job market curve.

For more information on this topic, visit:

https://www.nalp.org/2011selectedfindingsrelease

https://lawyerist.com/the-legal-job-market-is-as-bad-as-it-seems/